Naomi Franq Posts Stuff

funkloe:

some doodles i’ve done for the past month on scribs with my bestie and alone with myself on pchat

via funkloe
posted 4 days ago with 18 notes

ollymoss:

Prints on sale now.

via youknowthebzns · originally by ollymoss

naomifranq:

The set of Adventure Time stickers I made for an upcoming local convention (if you’re in Tallahassee, FL, check out ALT*Con at the Civic Center yo). I wanted to make more - Lemongrab, BMO, Ice King, Lemonhope, and even other princesses - but I did these last minute, and I’m not even sure if I’ll be able to get them printed and cut down in time for the convention. At the very least, people will be seeing me cutting out stickers at my table haha. 

posted 1 week ago with 26 notes
Anonymous asked: "Hello John, Your work is incredible. How long did it take you to find your "voice?" I feel like I am still jumping all over the place and I don't really understand how I am supposed to focus and draw one type of thing all the time. It is making me pretty anxious, which tends to paralyze me so I haven't been doing any good work at all in a while. Thank you so much for everything you share, you are my hero!"

richiepope:

johnleedraws:

image


First off, thank you!

I used to define “voice” (in regards to illustration) as “what you’re saying” combined with “how you are saying it.” Then, I’d make two fists and mash them together, as if that helped drive my point home. I’m a hand talker, guys.

I don’t know how other people define it, but for my purposes, that seemed like a reasonable definition: what and how? The big trick then, is how do you go about developing those two questions?

It’s funny that you say that I have an established voice, because I feel like I’ve only begun to scratch the surface. But, let’s take a look at the premier example of an established voice:

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Ok, so that Rockwell guy. Pretty good huh? We closely associate Rockwell with hyper-rendered, almost saccharine-sweet depictions of a mythical Americana. In the majority of his illustrations, he shows us an America without murder, prostitution, sexism, and racism (although he would tackle this in other paintings later), etc. He was quoted as saying “I unconsciously decided that, even if it wasn’t an ideal world, it should be. So I painted only the ideal aspects of it - pictures in which there are no drunken slatterns or self-centered mothers…”

The key words there are “it should be.” So in countless Saturday Evening Post covers, he presented to the public an idealized America, shown in the most realistic way he knew how, in an effort to make his fictional America manifest. And in a way, he succeeded, mostly in part because we Americans are a sentimental lot. Flip on the TV and watch any commercials around Christmas, or July 4th, and tell me that America hasn’t bought into that mythology. 

So his “what”: an idealized America. “How”: realistic painting. What happens if you throw either one of those things off? Robert Weaver, grandfather of the “avant garde” within illustration, once said “I wonder how Norman Rockwell would handle this article I have to illustrate titled ‘The Psychological Complications of Being Left-Handed’?” 

It’s not that Rockwell was in any way limited by his voice. In fact, most of what we know about Rockwell flies in the contrary of his work (“The life revealed here is one of anxiety, depression and loneliness, with feelings of failure, neglect and inadequacy.”) It’s that he had something very specific and personal to him that he wanted to express in the best way that he could.  And that’s how I think you should approach your own investigations towards a personal voice.

What is it that you care about? What is personal to you, and only you, that you can speak authoritatively about? What injustices do you see in the world? What stories aren’t being told that you think deserve to be? If you don’t think you can’t answer those questions yet, just sit down and do some writing. Start with what you know. Then branch out, get out of your head; go live your life, read books, have conversations, fall in love. All of this informs your work. 

The “how” is the technical side of this equation. It is your classes on color theory, your countless newsprint pads from figure drawing, and your experiments in your sketchbook. Honestly, it’s the easiest part. It just takes time and good practice to develop. 

And there’s one more little bit that I’d throw in there for good measure, and that’s “why?” Why are you making the work that you are? Dean Cornwell said this of Harvey Dunn’s Leonia school: “Perhaps the most valuable thing that Dunn taught us was honest dealing with our fellow men and a constant gratitude to the maker above for the privilege of seeing the sun cast shadows.” Regardless of one’s religious beliefs, I like this idea of “honesty and gratitude.” As an illustrator, artist, however you choose to define yourself, if you’re in this trade and you have the skillset, you have to ability to influence. What will you do with this ability?

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For example, have you guys seen this illustration about “stop and frisk” that Richie Pope posted yesterday? Absolutely killer. I know that the subject matter is very close to Richie’s heart, and you know what? It shows, man. 

If you’re not making good work right now (and let’s be honest, that’s a hard thing to admit to yourself), then you should take heart: that means that for every failed piece, you are one step closer to finding that voice. And that means that tomorrow has the potential to be a much better place than today. You just have to keep at it.

YOU GUYS are my heroes. Images have power. Stories have power. You guys have superhuman, mutant powers. Use them for good.

Great post from John Lee about personal voice. I’m flattered and appreciate the mention. 

via richiepope · originally by johnleedraws
richiepope:

My first illustration for Tor is out today for the  short story “The Devil in America,” by Kai Ashante Wilson.
R E A D    ”T H E    D E V I L    I N    A M E R I C A”

richiepope:

My first illustration for Tor is out today for the  short story “The Devil in America,” by Kai Ashante Wilson.

R E A D    ”T H E    D E V I L    I N    A M E R I C A”

naomifranq:

I definitely need to invest in a less harsher scanner. Anyway, finished quick watercolor of the Finn toon. Flowers apparently confuse young hero boys.

naomifranq:

I definitely need to invest in a less harsher scanner. Anyway, finished quick watercolor of the Finn toon. Flowers apparently confuse young hero boys.

Battle princess, ready for fantasy nutt kicking. #princessbubblegum #adventuretime #art

Battle princess, ready for fantasy nutt kicking. #princessbubblegum #adventuretime #art

Doodling some Adventure Time as table commission examples for the upcoming ALT*Con - if you’re in Florida, come for the 12th-13th weekend for a great convention and visit me at my table!

Doodling some Adventure Time as table commission examples for the upcoming ALT*Con - if you’re in Florida, come for the 12th-13th weekend for a great convention and visit me at my table!

gooddaymonster:

that is an excellent question

(also thank you so much!  you’re such a sweetheart ububu)

via blackat-greneys · originally by gooddaymonster

galehawthorn:

“This world was never meant for one as beautiful as you.” - Don McLean (Starry, Starry Night)

Happy Birthday, Vincent Van Gogh. 

via pinturasnegras · originally by tessascarstairs